Parents Council lists Best / Worst Advertisers

TV Arts

videonovelsyahoocom
This list is a year old, but it appears to be still relevant.  These
advertisers are picked by the show's they help sponsor.  Interestingly,
the "best" advertisers support some of the most boring shows that I
never watch (like F.B.Eye or Not-funny videos).  And the "worst"
advertisers support shows that I truly enjoy (like the Shield).

Hmmm.  Maybe I should write to Toyota, Nissan, et cetera and thank them
for their programming aimed at adults like me.  ;-)




WORST
1 Yum! Brands  -- The O.C.; MTV Spring Break; The Shield
2. Toyota Motor Sales Inc.  -- Las Vegas; LAX; Nip/Tuck; The Shield;
The O.C.
3. Sprint Corporation  -- Everwood; The O.C.; Quintuplets
4. Volkswagen -- The O.C.; Quintuplets
5. Ford -- Las Vegas; The O.C.
6. Daimler Chrysler  -- Fear Factor; MTV Spring Break
7. Pepsi  -- MTV Hits; MTV Spring Break; The O.C.
8. Nissan  -- The O.C.; The Shield
9. Citigroup  -- Las Vegas; Everwood
10. Proctor and Gamble  --MTV Reality Awards; MTV Hits; The O.C.



BEST
1. Campbell Soup - America's Funniest Home Videos; It's a Miracle
2. J.M. Smucker Company  -- Sue Thomas F.B.Eye; America's Funniest
3. Merck & Co.  -- Star Search; Sue Thomas F.B.Eye
4. Clorox -- Extreme Makeover: Home Edition; Joan of Arcadia
5. Colgate Palmolive  -- Sue Thomas F.B.Eye; Reba
6. Sears -- Joan of Arcadia
7. General Mills  -- Doc; Everybody Loves Raymond
8. Coca-Cola  -- The Biggest Loser; Steve Harvey's Big Time
9. Mars  -- Everybody Loves Raymond; It's a Miracle
10. Wal-Mart  -- 8 Simple Rules; American Idol

http://www.parentstv.org/PTC/advertisers/campaign.asp




Fast Facts

The 50+ crowd is the fastest growing market segment in the U.S., with
projected growth from 76.1 million adults in 2000 to 97.1 million by
2010 -- an increase of 27 percent (U.S. Census, Populations Projections
Program, 2000).

And based on a study conducted by AARP and RoperASW in 2002-'03, the
50+ market's loyalty for brands in various categories is often on par
with the 18-49 market, which means that they're just as fickle when it
comes to brand loyalty as the young demographic.
                                            
JacquesZMonkey
The only drawback being that many of them are dead.
                                            
Mike
Stop Cross-Posting
                                            
bf
He said , as he cross-posted more noise LOL.
                                            
Barnabas
Bear in mind the 18-49 male market the advertisers lust 
after are loyal to nothing, have very little discretionary
income.    On the other hand te 50+ market tends to have
much more discretionary income, 

I would point out of World War 2 veterans they
die off at the rate of about 1100 per day.   

Brand layolty is a thing of the past.
                                            
Steven
That doesn't matter because young people are more willing to go into 
debt to buy stuff anyway.  That's because young people are betting on 
their ability to keep getting raises and salary increases to pay off 
those debts eventually.  So they are willing to incur short-term debt to 
buy new cars frequently and buy all kinds of "gotta have it" high-tech 
gadgets with credit cards.
                                            
bf
Not only that, they tend to have less disposable money than the younger
people. There's a reason why the Oldies radio stations have great
ratings but lower ad rates.
                                            
Barnabas
Wrong.   The youger audience tends to have little disposable income,
the elderly are more likely to have extra income.
                                            
bf
Actually radio that targets people in the 30-40's tends to get the best
ad rates.

There's probably a correlation between that and money people really
spend, as opposed to somebody's poll.

I'm willing to bet that the majority of people over 50 do not have
their mortgage paid off.
If they have kids, they might be paying college tuition. They're also
paying off debt from their younger days perhaps.

If the over 50 crowd was really spending money, the oldies station
would get much better ad rates than it does.. how can you dispute that?
                                            
videonovelsyahoocom
???

People over 50 have more money to spend than any other group.  Young
people are struggling with bottom-of-the-rung $5-15 an hour jobs...
plus mortages... and other debt like schools & kids.  Young people have
little money left over.

In contrast, (most) people over 50 have virtually no debt (having paid
the mortgage off many years before), high-paying $20-40 an hour jobs,
and plenty of money saved in the bank waiting to be spent.

.
                                            
wendygcixcompulinkcouk
Depends who you know, but it's often true. Also, by 50+ if you're going to 
inherit any money from your parents/grandparents, you're likely to have 
done so.

Plus, a lot more people over 50 continue working these days.

wg
                                            
Anim8rFSK
And people now are taking 40 year 100% mortgages; they're going to be 
making payments until they're 60 or 70, assuming they don't get 
forclosed on.
                                            
videonovelsyahoocom
.

True but not really relevant to the *current day* conversation.  Those
types of mortgages did not exist in the 1950s/60s/70s (when today's 50+
crowd were just-married & borrowing to buy homes).

.
                                            
bf
Just saying what my friend in radio told me. The oldies station gets
much less money for airtime. I hate making generalities, but a lot of
older people are on a fixed budget, don't necessarily have the mortgage
paid off, and are a lot less willing to borrow money to get things now
than younger people.
                                            
Steven
But surveys have shown that older people are more set in their ways.  By 
the time they turn 50, they have a favorite brand of toothpaste, a 
favorite brand of junk food, etc..  So advertising has relatively little 
effect on getting them to try new things.  They already know what they 
want to buy.

Young people are more likely to rush out to buy the latest "gotta have 
it" high-tech gadget and so forth--as soon as advertising creates the 
demand for it.

Finally, it's easier for advertising to induce young people to go into 
debt to buy new items, and run up big balances on credit cards.  Older 
people like to have their debts paid off which reduces how much stuff 
they can buy.
                                            
Wayne
That's true of me, and I'm 51.  But then, it was equally true of me when
I was 21.  All my life, my strategy for dealing with new situations has
been to try different alternatives only until I find the one I like,
and then stick with it forever.  It takes a *lot* for me to change a
preference, and much, much more to change that preference a second time.
                                            
videonovelsyahoocom
.

Did you not read Post #1?  Let me quote the relevant portion that
debunks that MYTH:
http://www.parentstv.org/PTC/advertisers/campaign.asp

Fast Facts

The 50+ crowd is the fastest growing market segment in the U.S., with
projected growth from 76.1 million adults in 2000 to 97.1 million by
2010 -- an increase of 27 percent (U.S. Census, Populations Projections
Program, 2000).

And based on a study conducted by AARP and RoperASW in 2002-'03, the
50+ market's loyalty for brands in various categories is often on par
with the 18-49 market, meaning ***they're just as fickle when it comes
to brand loyalty*** as the young demographic. 



.
                                            
E
Yes and no. They have more money, but they are less likely to spend
a lot on consumables, and they tend to favor certain brands and are
reluctant to change. Older people spend their disposable income on big
ticket items like cars, boats, furniture and vacations, and usually go
by word of mouth and some internet research. They are tougher to
target than younger people with less money, who are usually willing to
spend a larger percentage of their income on consumables.
	epbrown
                                            
videonovelsyahoocom
.

Did you not read Post #1?  Let me quote the relevant portion that
debunks that MYTH:
http://www.parentstv.org/PTC/advertisers/campaign.asp

Fast Facts

The 50+ crowd is the fastest growing market segment in the U.S., with
projected growth from 76.1 million adults in 2000 to 97.1 million by
2010 -- an increase of 27 percent (U.S. Census, Populations Projections
Program, 2000).

And based on a study conducted by AARP and RoperASW in 2002-'03, the
50+ market's loyalty for brands in various categories is often on par
with the 18-49 market, meaning ***they're just as fickle when it comes
to brand loyalty*** as the young demographic. 



.
                                            
JacquesZMonkey
This may or may not be true, but it comes from the PTC site, where over
50% of the members are over 50, and is a study done by the AARP, and
ALL of its members are over 50. So it's in their best interests to make
the 50+ market as desirable as possible.

It's as if Playboy did a study and it came out saying men 18-35 were
the best consumers. You might want a more unbiased source before taking
that as fact.